Doodle Marker Guide For Beginner Artists

Doodle Marker Guide For Beginner Artists

Doodling is fun, and a great activity for kids. It can be taken to many places and can be drawn on different canvases. As you grow artistically, you’d naturally want to upgrade your doodle game and start to explore options on different markers and different canvases you can work with. (Image Credit: Karolina Grabowska/Pixabay)

When choosing your doodle marker, take into consideration every feature, function, and all other details. Don’t sell yourself short even on basic colors like white, because you’d be surprised how all white markers perform differently. An example would be a high-quality white chalk marker versus classroom chalk. Those two have different elements and components that you’re about to find out in this guide.

Color Selection and Opacity

If you’re working with a lot of colors, you’d want to be sure to get a set with a great range of hues and shades to choose from. Chalkboard markers and liquid pens with lots of vibrant color options are the best. The more vibrant colors you have, the better you can work with darker canvases because they’ll easily stand out.

When looking for chalk markers, be sure not to confuse it with classroom chalks, which are totally different from the former. Pigment-based ink is used on all chalk markers, and this makes the color opaque on all surfaces. Classroom chalk, on the other hand, is made from limestone.

Tiny details will not be unseen when vibrant and opaque markers are used to draw them. Signage, graffiti, and doodles will surely grab attention when the art stands out against the canvas used.

Tip Types

You may have heard of the fine tip, brush tip, and broad tip markers, but knowing the differences of these marker tips is important when you’re doing doodle art. A fine point tip is used for drawing close lines and details. It is good for corners and narrow working spaces for extreme precision.

Brush tips are for smooth spreading of ink. Think of watercolor; the soft and light strokes we use with them are what brush tips are good for. Chisel or broad tips are used for spreading color in larger canvases. You’ll get different experiences with each tip, so practicing with all three will make you familiar on their primary functions and how you can best work with them.

Versatility

Not all markers are created for all types of canvases. Some aren’t suitable for non-porous surfaces. These types of surfaces are glass, processed metals, leather, and plastic. If you’ve tried writing or drawing on these surfaces, you’d notice that some inks don’t perform well against them, despite working excellently on paper and other porous materials.

Most liquid markers can only be used on porous surfaces, but there are some types and brands that allow non-porous surface doodling, so look for those. The more surfaces your marker can work with, the more versatile it is and you’d get more benefit from it.

Dual-tip markers are also available. An example would be a something with both a brush tip and a fine tip, so you can use just one marker for two different purposes.

For chalk markers, waterproof types are available, which are good for outdoor canvases and all non-porous surfaces. These chalk markers are resistant to UV rays, so they will not fade. They are semi-permanent, so you can easily remove them if you wish to.

The art market has a limitless range of supplies, and with this guide, you’d be able to narrow down your options and have an easier time searching. With different types of markers, you’d be able to make different arts and illustrations that will further develop your talent. Nurture your artistry by being well-informed about your supplies.

Jacqueline Maddison

Jacqueline Maddison

Jacqueline Maddison is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Beverly Hills Magazine. She believes in shining light on the best of the best in life. She welcomes you into the world of the rich and famous with the ultimate luxury lifestyle.

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